Family Strength Building

A guide to building a strong family bond with your adult children, including a family strength-building workbook.

Family Strength Building

 

Do you want to improve your relationship with your adult children?

 

With the holidays and a new year and new decade approaching, this is a great time to begin working on some family relationship goals. Something that I hear quite often among my friends, is that now that their children are older – from older teens to those that are now adults and living on their own – their relationships with them have changed.

 

They long for the days when the kids were small and life was simpler. Since no one can go back in time, the best that can be done is to evolve and work on strengthening the family from the current point in time, with grown adult children.

 

Free Access To Midlife Resource Library

 

To begin, gather a clear vision in your head of what your family should look like. Are you envisioning something out of a Norman Rockwell  painting? The adult children return home for the holidays and everything is honky dory and happy? 

 

Norman Rockwell Home for Chrsitmas painting

Norman Rockwell’s Christmas Homecoming

This may not be a practical vision to hold on to, but that doesn’t mean you can’t strive for better and deeper family relationships.

 

Today’s family may not resemble the paintings of Norman Rockwell, but that is okay. Times have changed and we must change with them.

 

 

Family is about function and not structure 

 

It is common to mistake focusing on the family structure instead of the internal family functioning. There are strong single-parent families, strong step-families, strong nuclear families, strong extended families, and strong families with LGBT members. For every family structure you can imagine, there are numerous strong families. Likewise, every type of family structure around the world also has many families that are not functioning well. 

 

Benefits of Building Stronger Family Bonds

 

Your family can benefit by developing stronger relationships. Each family is unique and will benefit in different ways.

  • Appreciation

People in strong families deeply care for one another and regularly express their affection.

  • Positive Communication

Strong families spend time talking and listening to each other.

  • Successful Stress Management

Strong families possess the ability to cope with daily stress factors and deal effectively with crisis. They work together to meet inevitable challenges when they occur.

 

What Keeps You From Being a Closer Family?

 

What obstacles stand in the way of you and your family sharing a closer bond? As our children grow up, move out, start careers and families of their own, it may be much more difficult to maintain the closeness you once had. This, however, does not mean you can’t still be close. With today’s technology (texting and Facetime, for example), it is easier than ever to stay connected.

 

Some of the most common areas that need strengthening in an adult family are:

 

TRUST

COMMUNICATION

PROBLEM SOLVING

COMPROMISE

ACCEPTANCE

RESPECT

 

 

Free Workbook

 

It is important to look at your current strengths and identify a plan to strengthen areas of weakness. There are certain to be successes and missteps along the way to building your family’s strength. Keep working at it. With a positive mindset, you can grow a great deal and get your family to the realistic place you envision.

 

I have created a workbook to assist you with developing family strength with your grown children.

 

Family Strength Building With Your Grown Children Workbook

 

You can download it for free here.

 

You may be interested in my other self-help worksheets:

Growing Happiness

3 Steps To Personal Growth

Finding Your Midlife Path

 

 

XOXO

MaryJo

Building Family StrengthBuilding Strength With Your Adult Children

Author: MaryJo
I'm a life coach and founder of CoolBeanLiving.com, where I provide self-development resources for women that embrace and celebrate midlife.

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4 Comments

  • Hi Mary Joe, yes I totally agree with areas that you have have listed as need strengthening in the family. I’m married and my husband and I I have two teen with different personalities for the most part and we definitely work on communication with them. Though it’ll be nice if it was a one size fit all type of thing but its not lol! We also work on us and see what we can tweak a little to help with the strengthening. I downloaded your workbook. Thank you again for sharing! God bless!

  • It’s such a humbling thing to be aware of the functionality of your relationships, my kids are young now but I know our relationships will continue to grow as we do. Thanks for the guidance!